Deductive vs. inductive arguments

Deductive vs. inductive arguments


In this video, I will explain the difference
between a deductive and an inductive argument. So, broadly speaking, we can separate arguments
into two different types. The first type are deductive arguments. These are arguments whose
conclusions follow, or appear to follow, necessarily. All teachers are funny. Karin is a teacher.
Therefore Karin is funny. If all the premises are true, then the conclusion must also be
true. It must be true. Necessarily. Versus an inductive argument. This is an argument
whose conclusions follow, or appear to follow, probably. So, if we say 90% of teachers are
funny, and then we say Karin is a teacher, then we can conclude that Karin is funny. But we don’t know that for certain, because
she could be in that 10% of teachers who aren’t funny. So, whereas in the first argument,
if all teachers are funny, and if Karin is a teacher, well, then Karin must necessarily
be funny. But in the second argument, since only 90%
of all teachers are funny, um.. Then there’s a 90% chance that Karin is funny.
But there’s a chance that she is not. So, we’re gonna be interested- we’re not gonna
make a lot out of this distinction, I just want you to be aware that these two types
of arguments exist. And the type of argument we’re gonna be looking at exclusively are
the deductive arguments. So if you’re looking at inductive arguments, that is a different
branch of logic than we will be doing in this class. So we will be focusing on the logic of deductive
arguments. So, its important to know the distinction, just so that we know what we’re dealing with.

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