Introduction to electrical circuits | Electrical Physics | meriSTEM

Introduction to electrical circuits | Electrical Physics | meriSTEM


Hello! My name is Lachlan McGinness and I’m a departmental visitor here at the ANU as well as an Excited Particle, a
science performer at Questacon, and I’m a high school teacher here in Canberra. And what I’m going to be talking to you guys about is one of my favorite topics in
physics, electrical circuits. And what I love about electrical circuits is how
easily we can apply them to everyday life. Example, everyday I use my phone,
heaters, lights, kettles, computers. And all these devices are powered by electrical
circuits. Power is brought to buildings using extremely high-voltage power lines
at hundreds of thousands of volts. Power lines allow electrical energy to be
transferred over hundreds of kilometers. This voltage is then decreased or
transformed by one of these transformers when it reaches your house or office. So,
there was only 240 volts at the power points where we plug in our appliances.
So, batteries can also be used to power circuits. So, every battery contains two
terminals: a positive terminal and a negative terminal. Of this battery here,
our positive terminal and a negative terminal. And what happens is when you
connect an electrical component to the two terminals of the battery electrical
energy is transferred from the battery to the component and transformed or
converted into a form of useful energy. These circuits are how electrical energy
in the battery to be transformed into sounds energy, light energy, heat energy, and also kinetic energy which we call
motion. Please note that the energy in a battery
is not used up. It doesn’t just disappear. Instead it is changed into from one form
of energy, electrical energy, into another useable form such as light, energy heat
energy or sound energy. And this is the basis how circuits work. So, welcome to
this part of the course, electrical circuits.

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